Sunday Market

I’ve already mentioned the Turkish markets on this blog but I just can’t get over it.  On Sunday we spent about 20TL or $10 for the following:

  • 2 large melons
  • 2.5lb grapes
  • 2.5lb green beans
  • 1 red cabbage
  • 1 large bag garlic cloves
  • 1.5lb cucumber
  • 1.5lb zucchini
  • 4 pears
  • 8 peaches
  • 1.5lb white figs
  • 2.5lb carrots
  • 8 apples
  • 1.5lb tomatoes

All fresh, local, and (we think?) organic.  Just the figs would have cost half that much in California!  Unfortunately, there was no egg guy this week.  The way you buy a bag of produce is odd.  You kind of bag up what you want and hand it to the stand owner.  Then he takes out or ADDs produce to get an even kg weight.  I wanted 4 zucchini but he would only let me buy 3 because of the weight.  I bagged up how many grapes I wanted but he added more to make it an even number.  It’s such a great deal that I don’t ask questions. 🙂  Having all this fresh produce around has helped us get back on the paleo wagon after our move here.  Now if we could just stop eating the delicious Turkish bread we’d be good. 🙂ImageImage

 

 

 

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Turkish Eggs

I’ve been trying to get Evan to eat eggs since he was about 8 months old.  I’ve tried all kinds of eggs and cooking methods.  It’s been 13 months with no success – until now.  Introducing: Turkish eggs.  You buy these eggs at the market.  They come in this sketch-looking carton totally unrefrigerated off a Turkish guy’s truck:

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The actual egg looks better than even the most expensive organic eggs I’ve bought in the US.  They have thick shells and bright orange, thick yolks that stand up tall.  I didn’t edit this picture:

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These eggs must be organic and free-range judging by the look at taste, but not because of some idealistic idea like in the US.  It’s more like Turkey just does things the old-fashioned way.  The market produce also seems organic, not as a special thing but just because they grow old-fashioend non-GMO seeds out in a field then go out and harvest by hand.  Most unbelievable of it all is the price.  A large bag of veggies runs around $0.50, a large bag of fruit runs around $1.00, and THREE DOZEN of these fabulous eggs was about $3.50.  That’s less than one dozen of the organic, free-range eggs they had in California that Evan wouldn’t eat.  Here he is chowing down:

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Turkish Market

Our kind friends took us to a Turkish market this weekend.  After seeing the limited produce options on base, it was awesome to see all the fresh produce for sale.  Even better, the prices are SO low.  We got more fruits, veggies, and eggs than we could carry for around $10.  We’re trying to work on our Turkish language skills but it’s slow going.  For now we can pretty much only say “hi, thank you, and how much?”

Evan was a big hit at the market again.  He had a drove of Turkish children following him around and he wanted to hold hands and jump in the air with them:

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I’m still amazed at the way Turkish people just come and pick up children.  This guy just came and grabbed Evan to give him a hug, put him on the scale, and offer us a price for him (joking around).  Evan totally gets a kick out of it!

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Here’s more of Evan’s admirers.  Later a young boy like this saw Evan, ran into his house, and came out carrying his baby sister for Evan to meet.  Very sweet.

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I love these Turkish women.  Turkey is such an interesting mix of traditional, covered women and less traditional.  She kept trying to talk to me, maybe to sell a scarf?  I wish I could speak Turkish.  I was too busy keeping track of Evan to get a better picture of her, and she kept looking at my camera!  I’ll work on getting some better shots in the future.Image